Posted by: NCC Poverty Initiative Director | February 23, 2011

Development, Security, and Economic Justice: What’s Gender Got to Do with It?

Every March, the ecumenical faith community gathers in Washington, DC to lift our voices in prayer, song, reflection, and public witness at Ecumenical Advocacy Days (EAD). Forty-five co-sponsoring organizations bring in about 800 people for a four-day experience of solidarity and advocacy in our nation’s capitol.

This year’s theme is Development, Security, and Economic Justice: What’s Gender Got to Do with It? Main speakers and preachers will include: Rev. John Arthur and Monique Nunes from Lutheran World Federation, NCC-USA president Rev. Peg Chemberlin, Union Seminary Dean Daisy L. Machado, National Women’s Law Center’s senior counsel Regina L. Oldak, Women Thrive Worldwide founder Ritu Sharma, and JustFaith ministries director Jack Jezreel.

The Eco-Justice track will consist of six workshops that will focus on gender justice as it relates to domestic and international environmental health, climate change, and food sovereignty issues. Click here for the full eco-justice workshop descriptions with speakers’ bios.

This year’s conference will start the evening of March 25 and end in the early evening of March 28. Click here for the conference schedule. All sessions Friday through Sunday will be held at the Doubletree Hotel in Crystal City, Virginia. Monday will be an advocacy day on Capitol Hill.

Registration is very affordable. If you register before March 4, your meals and conference participation will be covered for $160.00 for the four days. If you just want to register for one day, you can do that for $80.00. Young adult scholarships are available if you apply by Saturday, Feb. 26.

Email me at shantha@nccecojustice.org if you have any questions.  Click here to register now.

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Responses

  1. […] Health, while certainly it is an issue that affects everyone, is also a women’s issue. The 2011 Ecumenical Advocacy Days is on “Development Security and Economic Justice: What’s Gender Got to do with […]


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